Gentleman Of Style, Gentleman of Substance
underraged:

My throat hurts quite terribly and its rainy and I just want things to not suck for more than ten minutes.

April showers and all that, the weather will be worth it in the end…… As for the other stuff, feel free to drop me a line if you want/need to chat….

underraged:

My throat hurts quite terribly and its rainy and I just want things to not suck for more than ten minutes.

April showers and all that, the weather will be worth it in the end…… As for the other stuff, feel free to drop me a line if you want/need to chat….

I am a mother of three girls, ages 2, 6, and 8. Two of them are Sandy Hook School students – one in first grade, one in third grade. I would like to share with you our experience with Dec 14th and my feelings on gun control.

My third grader has gone thru some deep grief over the loss of her siblings’ friends. She was devastated by the loss of the teachers, especially her principal, Dawn Hocksprung, whom we all loved. She is angry that this has happened, that lives were lost so tragically and that she can no longer go to her school. When she was evacuated that day to the fire house, she did not know if her little sister had survived. She struggles with the concept that there is evil in the world, that something this horrific could happen to this town, to her, to her sisters, to her friends. She is 8.

In addition to the tragic loss of her playmates, friends, and teachers, my first grader suffers from PTSD. She was in the first room by the entrance to the school. Her teacher was able to gather the children into the tiny bathroom inside the classroom. There she stood, with 14 of her classmates and her teacher, all of them crying. You see, she heard what was happening on the other side of the wall. She heard everything. Shooting. Screaming. Pleading. She was sure she was going to die that day and did not want to die for Christmas. Imagine what this must have been like.

With PTSD comes fear – all kinds of fear. Each time she hears a loud or unfamiliar noise, she experiences the fear she had in that bathroom. She is not alone. All of her classmates have PTSD. She struggles nightly with nightmares, difficulty falling asleep, and being afraid to go anywhere in her own home. At school she becomes withdrawn, crying daily, covering her ears when it gets too loud and waiting for this to happen again. She is 6.

Imagine being this age and living like this. My children face their fears every day by getting on the bus and going to school. Would you be able to do the same? How would you feel if these were your children?

Although we are getting help and trying to heal, this will affect us for the rest of our lives. We are thankful that by the grace of god, our children came home to us on Dec. 14. As a family and a community, we are deeply saddened and heartbroken at the loss of so many innocent children and beloved teachers.

We are also furious.

Furious that 26 families must suffer with grief so deep and so wide that it is unimaginable.

Furious that the innocence and safety of my children’s lives has been taken.

Furious that someone had access to the type of weapon used in this massacre.

Furious that this type of weapon is even legal.

Furious that gun makers make ammunition with such high rounds and our government does nothing to stop them.

Furious that the ban on assault weapons was carelessly left to expire.

Furious that lawmakers let the gun lobbyists have so much control.

Furious that somehow, someone’s right to own a gun is more important than my children’s rights to life.

Furious that common sense has gone out the window.

Furious that lawmakers are too scared to take a stand.

The “what if’s” never stop going through my mind. What if this weapon were still banned? What if there weren’t high capacity rounds? What if the shooter had different bullets? I think the carnage would have been a lot less. Yes, there would have been losses. But there would have been time. Time to react and possibly make a difference.

Those children and teachers had NO CHANCE. They did not just get shot. They got blown apart.

It’s time to stop catering to the gun owners and lobbyists and start caring about our children, our families, our teachers, our friends and our neighbors. The NRA does not care about people, they care about money.

I don’t believe that anyone, other than the military, has a right to own the type of weapon or ammo used at Sandy Hook.

The second amendment is not limitless.

Weapons like the AR15 have no place in society. This is simply common sense.

Veronique Pozner, mother of Noah Pozner, killed at Sandy Hook Elementary, gave this statement which I believe whole-heartedly:
“The equation is terrifyingly simple: Faster weapons equal more fatalities. This is not about the right to bear arms. It is about the right to bear weapons with the capacity for mass destruction.”

We are trying to move forward, but there must be change. If our lawmakers cannot make this change, then we, as a people will elect those who will.

Excerpt from a letter by CARRIE LENDROTH BATTAGLIA, the mother of two children who survived the Sandy Hook school massacre.

I dare the Republican members of Congress to take a meeting with her, or any other parent of the victim of gun violence.

(via inothernews)

nemomedia:

kattygirls:

Ewoks are real… 

More Mogwai them Ewok

nemomedia:

kattygirls:

Ewoks are real…

More Mogwai them Ewok

underraged:

This is my favorite dress, what should I do in it?

underraged:

This is my favorite dress, what should I do in it?

nemomedia:

underraged:

Second selfie, but I really want someone to cuddle me and tell me I’m not ugly

I can’t help with the cuddling, I expect I’m not your type anyway, but I assure you you are NOT ugly!

nemomedia:

underraged:

Second selfie, but I really want someone to cuddle me and tell me I’m not ugly

I can’t help with the cuddling, I expect I’m not your type anyway, but I assure you you are NOT ugly!

JD Vernon - When It Rains Down Here
529 plays

slater-knight:

midnightminute:

When It Rains Down Here- JD Vernon

My favorite
toofreaky:

This is one of the most interesting and inspiring pages I’ve read in a very long time. I want to do something like this. Maybe one day I will.

toofreaky:

This is one of the most interesting and inspiring pages I’ve read in a very long time. I want to do something like this. Maybe one day I will.